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(Last Updated On: July 18, 2018)

Old Plane in a New Bottle: Airbus A220-300

It wouldn’t be an overstatement to say that after acquiring a major stake in Bombardier’s CSeries line of jets, Airbus finally poured the new planes into a newly branded bottle of A2XX series. The CS300 in its new livery of Airbus A220-300 was warmly greeted upon its landing in Toulouse, France at the Airbus Headquarters on 10 July, 2018.

The A2XX series of airbus would showcase the older line of Bombardier’s CS100, capable of typically hauling 120 passengers and re-titled as the A220-100. Additionally the larger cousin would be the CS300, which can typically haul between 130 to 140 passengers depending upon the configuration chosen by the airline/operator. The later has been re-titled as the Airbus A220-300.

Airbus A220-300

The new line-up of Airbus planes are optimally designed to capture market of planes in the 100-150 seat range, and would be a perfect blend when offered aside their slightly larger Airbus counterparts i.e. the A320 family.

However, last year, before Airbus took over the program, Boeing Co. filed a trade complaint against Bombardier, alleging that the Canadian planemaker had sold the aircraft to Delta Air Lines Inc. at “absurdly low” prices. While the Commerce Department initially decided to impose duties of almost 300 percent on the plane, a U.S. trade panel blocked the tariffs.

For Airbus, quickly building an order book for the A220 is a crucial challenge as the Toulouse, France-based company seeks to lower costs. To make the aircraft viable, the plane-maker says it needs a “double-digit” reduction in costs in its supply chain and is in the process of negotiating with suppliers.

The new line-up of Airbus planes are optimally designed to capture market of planes in the 100-150 seat range, and would be a perfect blend when offered aside their slightly larger Airbus counterparts i.e. the A320 family.

However, last year, before Airbus took over the program, Boeing Co. filed a trade complaint against Bombardier, alleging that the Canadian planemaker had sold the aircraft to Delta Air Lines Inc. at “absurdly low” prices. While the Commerce Department initially decided to impose duties of almost 300 percent on the plane, a U.S. trade panel blocked the tariffs.

For Airbus, quickly building an order book for the A220 is a crucial challenge as the Toulouse, France-based company seeks to lower costs. To make the aircraft viable, the plane-maker says it needs a “double-digit” reduction in costs in its supply chain and is in the process of negotiating with suppliers.

However, things look good for AIRBUS, as soon after the ceremony in Toulouse of the arrival of the branded A220-300, the company announced a deal to sell US airline JetBlue 60 planes that were formerly part of Canadian manufacturer Bombardier’s C series. It was the first contract since the aircraft were rechristened by the aerospace giant as the A220-300, which can carry between 100 and 150 passengers.

Airbus signed a memorandum of understanding with US carrier JetBlue for a contract worth about $7 billion based on list prices, the company said.


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